Rabbit Stories for Everyone

Rabbit Stories by Kim Shuck is published by Poetic Matrix Press. Cover art by Michael Horse.
Rabbit Stories by Kim Shuck is published by Poetic Matrix Press. Cover art by Michael Horse.

If you had a trickster rabbit following you through life, and you started keeping company with someone who had a fox, and even Robin Hood hovering nearby, would Rabbit and Fox and Robin Hood start hanging out together too?  In Rabbit Stories, by Kim Shuck, they do.

Rose bakes with flowers, gardens with wisdom, beads with intent, sprinkles tobacco over buried streams, and loves a man on the other side of the Atlantic. This is the life of an indigenous woman as observed by herself and Trickster Rabbit,  who cleverly calls her Rabbit Food.  Together they inhabit a land without borders, where new stories are told by old characters.

Kim Shuck weaves a complexity of fibers plucked from a disparate modern world, and gives us a thing of beauty. I took small bites of these lovingly crafted stories, relishing each tidbit,  not wanting to reach the end, just like I would the cookies that Rabbit Food bakes when insomnia calls. But these stories are poetry without beginning or end, catching the reader in an intricate web of space and time.

It is best to read Rabbit Stories just as it was written, with intent, to pause, to think, to absorb the layers of time and meaning. By the end you might find yourself looking around more closely to observe what mischief has been created by a trickster running free in your yard, and watching your every move.

 

 

It’s better the second time

You can take her out of New York, but she’ll still want bagels. Not from the supermarket either. She might even dream about bagels and wake up with a little drool leaking from between her lips. But that doesn’t mean she ever knew how to make them herself.

Bagels made from scratch, with garlic, onion and sea salt.
Bagels made from scratch, with garlic, onion and sea salt.

It turns out, (after very little research) that boiling the dough in honey water for a minute on each side, and using a little malt in the batter, is what makes a bagel a bagel, (baked at 425 for twenty minutes.)

The first time I made bagels, I handled them too much, and they wilted on me. This time I didn’t rush things. I let them take their time rising the first time, and the second time too when I poked my finger in each one to make a hole. Then after boiling them, I laid them down gently on a well greased pan. The second time was much better.  I’m sure that the more intimate I get with my bagel batter, the better the bagel will be!

Breakfast dinner, before, after and ten minutes later.

Today they closed school early because of a little snow. That’s how it is here in the South. I love it. With about five dozen eggs in the fridge, it seemed like a good night for a breakfast dinner…

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An update on WPCI Radio in Greenville

When I drive around Greenville, I love to listen to WPCI Radio, 1490 AM, because there is continuously great music, a great variety of music, and no commercials. What more could you ask for? Unfortunately, for the last week, I’ve gotten nothing but static. Hoping that this wasn’t permanent, I sent an e-mail to Randy Mathena, the generous spirit who hosts the radio station, to ask him what was going on.

Unfortunately for him, the cold weather has taken a toll on his transmitter, but the station should be heard on the airwaves again next week. In the meantime, you can search for WPCI at tunein.com, and listen to it on your computer or smartphone. He told me that he hooks up his smartphone in his car to listen because of the “CD quality sound.”

I just listen the old fashioned way, so I’m looking forward to when he gets that transmitter working again, and I’m sending my appreciative thoughts in his direction. So, happy listening! And, if you appreciate the station as much as I do,  then don’t be shy about it. Spread the love around!

How to Get Going Now with your First Spring Garden

Just like for a first date, if you plan ahead for your first garden, you’ll have a better experience. And don’t try to make everything happen the first time around. Leave some space for your garden to grow. If it turns into a love affair, then your ideas and your abilities will grow with your relationship with your garden. Plan the best you can, because that’s all you can really do. You’re limited by how much you know, the uncertainty of the weather, and the availability of water and sunshine. So after you’ve done your planning, don’t worry about it! Just throw caution to the wind and get busy with Earth.

Your choices are between plants that will keep coming back every year, perennials, and plants that will only perform once for you, annuals, plants that you can consume, and the ones that are pretty, or just smell good. Your standard vegetable garden usually consists of all annuals. Gardeners have abundant natures. It’s easy to look at a seed and forget just how many tomatoes, or cucumbers or zucchinis can really come from just that one seed, and that they really do need a few feet of space around them to produce all that food for you!

The scent of a Peony can change your outlook for the day. It was planted before we moved here, and comes back every year without any maintenance at all...
The scent of a Peony can change your outlook for the day. It was planted before we moved here, and comes back every year without any maintenance at all…

To lighten your load from year to year, consider what edible perennials you can cultivate. Do you have room for a fruit tree? Find out what kind of fruit grows without too much trouble where you live, and start with that. Fruit trees are difficult, if not impossible to grow from seed. You should just buy a baby tree. Berries are very, very good for you and require practically no maintenance. They grow almost like weeds if they get enough sun, so you have to be careful where you put them. They are also usually thorny, so you will want to place them up against a fence or on the outer edge of your garden. There are a few perennial vegetables too, like asparagus and artichoke. There are also many herbs that will come back from year to year. Some plants stay green all winter long, like parsley, and will add a little cheer to a drab, cold winter scene.

Before my garden is even ready for planting, I get a little potted garden of lettuce going, cuz I like a fresh salad every night...
Before my garden is even ready for planting, I get a little potted garden of lettuce going, cuz I like a fresh salad every night…

Vegetables need daily watering in hot, dry weather. Commit to standing there with the hose on hot days, or put in a drip hose or sprinklers. If you are going to hose your garden, make sure you will be able to reach everything with the hose. If you’re going to put in a drip hose, then early spring, before planting time is the time to do it. Are you handy with installing a timer? The extra effort to make watering as simple and efficient as possible could save your garden if you are called away by unexpected events for a day or two. A neglected garden under stress will wither and die in the blink of an eye.

Parsley stays green all winter long.
Parsley stays green all winter long.

Make your list of what you want to grow, then decide where you’ll place them, and when. It’s best to group together annuals and perennials. This way you can completely turn over and amend the soil in your annual bed every year. If you had perennial plants here and there, that you didn’t want to pull up, it would make the task of turning your soil and adding fertilizer more difficult.

 

Purple cabbage does better in the cool spring weather than in withering heat.
Purple cabbage does better in the cool spring weather than in withering heat.

The Farmer’s Almanac is your best friend when it comes to figuring out when to start planting your seeds. You can punch in your zip code and find out starting times for plants that you want to grow. This is very important. I found out that my cayenne peppers weren’t mature enough by the end of the growing season, because I waited until after the last frost and put the seeds directly in the ground. This year I will put mature starters in the ground. If you don’t have room to grow your starters then you might buy already mature pepper starters from a nursery when the time comes. On the other hand if you live in a hot climate, you might be able to keep your pepper plant as a perennial. There is no replacement for your own experience. Even what’s true for your area may not be entirely true for your relationship with your garden. From year to year you will nurture and learn, and plan again as best you can.

My husband grows rows of head lettuce, that get eaten by us and the neighbors too. You can only eat so much lettuce.
My husband grows rows of head lettuce, that get eaten by us and the neighbors too. You can only eat so much lettuce. You can try staggering your plantings of lettuce, to keep it coming all summer. I’ve had only moderate success at keeping a steady supply going.

You will most likely use a combination of seeds, and starters. Radishes grow quickly in spring, from seed, and lettuce too, after the last frost. Starters you will buy when you’re ready to plant them. Usually there are all kinds of tomatoes available, squashes and cucumbers. If you only plant those three things, keep them watered, and give them some plant food once a month, your first date will likely be an enjoyable one, leaving you wanting another dance.

Right now is the time to flirt with all the possibilities. When early spring rolls around, when it’s time to start digging, and kneeling and bending over, and paying for seeds, you’ll be making a commitment, and things will go better if you know what you want to get out of it.

Rabbit and Rose Issue 05

Editor Kim Shuck, author of Rabbit Stories has included my longish poem entitled “Clear Lake” in the current issue of Rabbit and Rose Online Poetry JournalI. Thanks Kim!

I’m privileged to have my poetry included with poems by John D. Berry, Kim McMillon, Howard Miller, Jeanetta Calhoun Mish, Mary Jean Robertson, Linda Rodriguez and Brianna Lea Pruitt.

Poetry, Storytelling, Fiction, Creative Non-Fiction, Drama

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